"He had known several men who blew their heads off, and he had pondered it much.  It seemed to him it was probably because they could not take enough happiness just from the sky and the moon to carry them over the low feelings that come to all men."

— quote from Larry McMurtry’s Lonesome Dove manually transcribed by Donald Judd onto a piece of notebook paper in 1989, now on exhibit in Marfa at the Judd Foundation show on Judd’s land conservation and desert structures, “From Arroyo Grande to Ayala de Chinati.”

via: whatthezeitgeistwants

At right, a red stack by Donald Judd, “Untitled (Bernstein 78-69)” (1978), at Mnuchin Gallery.

[Judd Foundation. Licensed by VAGA, New York, N.Y.]

Donald Judd, Untitled (Lascaux 89-59), 1989. Enamel on aluminum, 11 13/16 x 70 7/8 x 11 13/16 inches (30 x 180 x 30 cm) Art © Judd Foundation. Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Courtesy of David Zwirner, New York/London.

via manpodcast:
Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.
“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.
All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984).  via manpodcast:
Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.
“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.
All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984).  via manpodcast:
Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.
“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.
All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984).  via manpodcast:
Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.
“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.
All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984).  via manpodcast:
Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.
“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.
All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984). 

via manpodcast:

Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.

“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984). 

(via 3rdofmay)

“What would Judd make of the whole thing? “Judd thought architects were assholes and idiots,” said Stephen Cassell, a principal at Architecture Research Office who handled the project. “He never worked with an architect.” ARO used a light touch. “You know that old kung-fu TV show where they walk across rice paper?” Mr. Cassell asked. “This was like that—leave no footprints.””
judd’s architectural studio, marfa, texas

“in the early 1970s, judd acquired a number of buildings in marfa, texas, converting each to have a specific purpose and demonstrating sensitivity to the original structures while maximizing light and space… most of the properties contained permanent installations of work by judd, as well as the art he collected…” more here. 

via: materiallust

judd’s architectural studio, marfa, texas

“in the early 1970s, judd acquired a number of buildings in marfa, texas, converting each to have a specific purpose and demonstrating sensitivity to the original structures while maximizing light and space… most of the properties contained permanent installations of work by judd, as well as the art he collected…” more here

via: materiallust

“The Judd Oral History Project had its start in 2006 when a local public radio station in Marfa, Texas, wanted to air a series of interviews with people who had known and worked with Judd, whose abrupt move there from New York in 1972 radically transformed the sleepy prairie town into an outpost of the international art circuit. When the proposal reached the Judd Foundation, however, the foundation’s at-the-time newly arrived executive director, Barbara Hunt McLanahan, saw it as an opportunity to gather material for the Judd Foundation’s archive. Meanwhile Rainer Judd, the Judd Foundation’s President and Historical Consultant and a filmmaker in her own right, felt that voice-only radio interviews would not do justice to the rich store of material at hand: as she says, ‘you want to see their faces, don’t you?’”

After Judd passed away in 1994 a provision in his will established the Judd Foundation, which operates in both Marfa and New York and competes with Chinati on more or less friendly terms. The legacy the sculptor left behind, not the least of which is his kilometer-long installation of concrete boxes (his literal mark on the earth) on a prickly stretch of Chinati’s main property, attracts artists, gallery owners, and chic entrepreneurs to a city whose residents in 1990 numbered 2,424 — less than one-one thousandth of Brooklyn’s population today. Businesses thrive as tourism pumps life into the economy, and Marfa, a magnet for weekend Texans and the art-world cognoscenti, is rescued from almost certain obsolescence.

But this hagiographic narrative omits much of what makes Marfa tick.

For example, you’ll rarely hear about how two of its biggest property and stakeholders, the Chinati and Judd foundations, are exempt from paying taxes on multiple lots because of their 501(c)(3) nonprofit status. According to Presidio County tax records, Chinati paid $1,189 in taxes in February on four properties valued at a total of $85,490. Another 14 Chinati properties, and all the Judd Foundation’s 19 properties in the county, are exempt from taxes.

Vicky Ho, ”Judge Roy Bean, Donald Judd, and the Myth West of the Pecos”

via: 7STOPS