Donald Judd Home + Studio: open to the public.

In 1984 Donald Judd bought an old factory with five floors at 101 Spring Street in Soho which he made his home, studio and permanent installation.

An apt reflection of his design philosophy, 101 Spring Street shows how Donald considered art in relation to architecture and how he lived, worked and slept surrounded with works of his contemporaries.

via: freundevonfreunden

"He had known several men who blew their heads off, and he had pondered it much.  It seemed to him it was probably because they could not take enough happiness just from the sky and the moon to carry them over the low feelings that come to all men."

— quote from Larry McMurtry’s Lonesome Dove manually transcribed by Donald Judd onto a piece of notebook paper in 1989, now on exhibit in Marfa at the Judd Foundation show on Judd’s land conservation and desert structures, “From Arroyo Grande to Ayala de Chinati.”

via: whatthezeitgeistwants

At right, a red stack by Donald Judd, “Untitled (Bernstein 78-69)” (1978), at Mnuchin Gallery.

[Judd Foundation. Licensed by VAGA, New York, N.Y.]

Donald Judd, Untitled (Lascaux 89-59), 1989. Enamel on aluminum, 11 13/16 x 70 7/8 x 11 13/16 inches (30 x 180 x 30 cm) Art © Judd Foundation. Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Courtesy of David Zwirner, New York/London.

via manpodcast:
Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.
“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.
All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984).  via manpodcast:
Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.
“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.
All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984).  via manpodcast:
Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.
“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.
All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984).  via manpodcast:
Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.
“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.
All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984).  via manpodcast:
Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.
“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.
All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984). 

via manpodcast:

Here are all five of Donald Judd’s multicolored floor pieces. (A sixth floor piece, in ‘blank’ galvanized iron, is at the Tate.) One of them, the version in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, is included in “Donald Judd: The Multicolored Works” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts through January 4. Exhibition curator Marianne Stockebrand is this week’s guest on The Modern Art Notes Podcast.

“The Multicolored Works” is the first museum exhibition to focus on Judd’s use of color, and more specifically Judd’s use of color in the 1980s, when he discovered a process that enabled a new kind of sculpture. It includes 23 Judd sculptures as well as works on paper and collages from the collection of the Judd Foundation that reveal Judd’s creative process. The gorgeous exhibition is a shoo-in to rank highly on critics’ year-end top-ten lists.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

All of the multicolored floor pieces are untitled. From the top, where they are: Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1989), Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1984), , Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (1989-90), Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989), Herbert Collection, Ghent (1984). 

(via 3rdofmay)

“What would Judd make of the whole thing? “Judd thought architects were assholes and idiots,” said Stephen Cassell, a principal at Architecture Research Office who handled the project. “He never worked with an architect.” ARO used a light touch. “You know that old kung-fu TV show where they walk across rice paper?” Mr. Cassell asked. “This was like that—leave no footprints.””
judd’s architectural studio, marfa, texas

“in the early 1970s, judd acquired a number of buildings in marfa, texas, converting each to have a specific purpose and demonstrating sensitivity to the original structures while maximizing light and space… most of the properties contained permanent installations of work by judd, as well as the art he collected…” more here. 

via: materiallust

judd’s architectural studio, marfa, texas

“in the early 1970s, judd acquired a number of buildings in marfa, texas, converting each to have a specific purpose and demonstrating sensitivity to the original structures while maximizing light and space… most of the properties contained permanent installations of work by judd, as well as the art he collected…” more here

via: materiallust